Tim Woolworth

Paranormal Researcher, Writer & Public Speaker 
AGE: 40
LOCATION: Ann Arbor, MI
EMAIL: tim@itcvoices.org


Ghost boxes are simply broken radios with a few added features. For those who are unaware of what a ghost box is, think of it as a device that allows real-time communication with transentities. We do not know who we are speaking with, we only know that there are intelligent replies demonstrative of conscious intent of an unknown origin.


Ghost boxes were first made by a man named Frank Sumption. Sumption produced the first ghost box in 2002 and in 2004, an investigator received one of these boxes from Frank and these devices made by Sumption became known as "Frank's Boxes." The name Frank's Box can only be applied to one of the 180 ghost boxes, or one of the 9 video boxes made by Frank.


Ghost boxes use a radio receiver. Voltage is applied to this circuit and it allows the scanning of the tuner with no muting of static output. There are many different types of ghost boxes out there today, some scan linearly and others randomly - some do both. You can find boxes with AM and FM reception as well. There are approximately ten persons in the world who make custom, boutique boxes and these box types can be very pricey, usually starting at around $300 and go upwards of $3,000 per box.


There are other options for those who wish to pursue this line of ITC. There are numerous off-the-shelf radios that can be modified to scan like a ghost box does. These are referred to in our circle as Shack Hacks because the first hackable radios were from Radio Shack. Hacking a radio entails taking off the plastic housing, and either cutting a mute wire or soldering in a bypass switch. There are radios right now that cost $10 that can be modified into a functional ghost box five minutes or less. Shack hack ghost boxes provide a very simple functions. When you are in your car and you hit the scan button on your car stereo, it jumps to the signals with the strongest signal and mutes all the static and weak channels. Cutting the mute wire bypasses this function and allows all of that suppressed noise to come to the surface.


The last option is the commercially produced P-SB line. These radio provide a digital linear scan at fixed intervals and add in artificial white noise with each frequency step.

Ghost Boxes